When Women Invented Television: The Untold Story of the Female Powerhouses Who Pioneered the Way We Watch Today  (Hardcover)

When Women Invented Television: The Untold Story of the Female Powerhouses Who Pioneered the Way We Watch Today (Hardcover)

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“Leaps at the throat of television history and takes down the patriarchy with its fervent, inspired prose. When Women Invented Television offers proof that what we watch is a reflection of who we are as a people.” Nathalia Holt, New York Times bestselling author of Rise of the Rocket Girls

New York Times bestselling author of Seinfeldia Jennifer Keishin Armstrong tells the little-known story of four trailblazing women in the early days of television who laid the foundation of the industry we know today.

It was the Golden Age of Radio and powerful men were making millions in advertising dollars reaching thousands of listeners every day. When television arrived, few radio moguls were interested in the upstart industry and its tiny production budgets, and expensive television sets were out of reach for most families. But four women—each an independent visionary— saw an opportunity and carved their own paths, and in so doing invented the way we watch tv today.

Irna Phillips turned real-life tragedy into daytime serials featuring female dominated casts. Gertrude Berg turned her radio show into a Jewish family comedy that spawned a play, a musical, an advice column, a line of house dresses, and other products. Hazel Scott, already a renowned musician, was the first African American to host a national evening variety program. Betty White became a daytime talk show fan favorite and one of the first women to produce, write, and star in her own show.

Together, their stories chronicle a forgotten chapter in the history of television and popular culture.

But as the medium became more popular—and lucrative—in the wake of World War II, the House Un-American Activities Committee arose to threaten entertainers, blacklisting many as communist sympathizers. As politics, sexism, racism, anti-Semitism, and money collided, the women who invented television found themselves fighting from the margins, as men took control. But these women were true survivors who never gave up—and thus their legacies remain with us in our television-dominated era. It's time we reclaimed their forgotten histories and the work they did to pioneer the medium that now rules our lives.

This amazing and heartbreaking history, illustrated with photos, tells it all for the first time. 

Review

"Armstrong's depth of knowledge and easy command of the material make her subjects compelling from the first beat. Her writingpropulsive, and neatly scene-oriented—can feel almost like watching television....In prose as charming as the women she writes about, she makes her subjects feel knowable....makes you feel their genius and charisma, almost like you were there when they invented television." -- Boston Globe

"Armstrong uses her impressive analytic and research skills to unearth some much less-explored ground....Armstrong also makes strong statements about the fact that women were marking these accomplishments during a time when they were expected to stay home and care for their families....a definite step in the right direction toward giving just some of these forgotten women their due.” -- AV Club

"Catnip for TV fans and a welcome addition to the literature of television history." -- Minneapolis Star Tribune
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Harper (March 23, 2021)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Hardcover ‏ : ‎ 352 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0062973304
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0062973306
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 1.4 pounds
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 6 x 1.13 x 9 inches

All copies are new.